REPLACEMENT CENTERBOARD AVAILABLE

Posts about mechanical systems on a Telstar, including the outboard engine.

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Re: REPLACEMENT CENTERBOARD AVAILABLE

Postby wooden » Fri Jan 31, 2014 2:06 am

I have finally been able to replace my centerboard, and I wanted to report on the ordeal.

I first have to tell everyone that the video which is available that shows and describes the centerboard replacement is very accurate. The process is exactly as the video depicts, with one exception. The replacement centerboard does not come with the hardware, and you will have to transfer the rotation mechanism from your old board to the new one. This process is pretty straight forward, and I had absolutely no problem doing this. The hardware and rope on the old board was in excellent condition. You can replace the rope if you wish, but I found it much easier to keep the rope on the rotation drum and just move the entire unit to the new board and secure it with the existing hardware.

With that in mind, you want to make sure that you don't lose or damage any of the existing parts. I am not sure how you would replace the drum if you damaged it. The pins and the crank are pretty unique as well, so keep track of everything you take off.

I would highly recommend that you use some sort of lift to raise the boat for easy access to the underside. If I had such an option, I could have replaced the board in a couple of hours. Because I had no access to a lift, and the local marina was not comfortable using their forklift to raise the boat off the trailer, I was stuck trying to replace the board while the boat was on the trailer. Difficult, but not impossible. This is what I did:

1. I placed piston jacks on the tongue and both sides at the rear of the trailer. It is critically important the you take every precaution to stabilize the boat laterally. I also used blocks on the trailer at the front, sides, and rear of the trailer as I proceeded with the following.
2. I removed the trailer support (spreader) bar that was forward of the centerboard cavity
3. I removed the front tires and axle. If you do not stabilize the trailer as I suggested above, you might find the boat on its side at this point. I found this out when I removed one tire and lowered the trailer without the trailer supports as described above. It drastically tilted to the side. That made be realize just how unstable the situation could become if great care is not taken.
4. Once the axle and bar were removed, I had good access to the centerboard cavity. However, there was not enough space between the pavement and cavity to insert the board.
5. I then slowly raised the trailer up on blocks a little at a time. I ended up with two blocks under each side at the rear of the trailer, and three blocks at the front of the trailer where the tongue converges with the frame. I also kept jacks on each side of the trailer. All of this made the boat and trailer extremely stable side to side and front to back.
6. This made the distance between the ground and the centerboard cavity about 29 inches, just enough to fit the centerboard side guides into the cavity and lifted the centerboard into place. I should note here that the side guides, which are part of the rotation mechanism, have to pin points. The upper point is at the rotation drum. Place a temporary wooden or plastic pin in here. You will punch it out with the crank when the new centerboard is in place. This is kind of depicted in the video. The lower pin in the side guide that attaches it to the centerboard must be in place before you lift the now board in place.
7. I then entered the boat, placed the crank and pins, and tested the movement of the centerboard. PERFECT!
8. I then carefully lowered the trailer off the blocks. I did replace the support (spreader) bar because I think this is an important part of the front frame stability, but I plan on launching the boat on one axle. I only have to go 100 yards to the ramp, so I do not expect this to be a problem. I would not take this on the highway with one axle.

That is my individual experience with replacing the centerboard. I was a bit disappointed in the poor quality of the original board. The new board is outstanding, and I expect it to last the life of the boat. I sure hope it will, because I never want to do through this again.

Steve Wooden
Steve & Mittie Wooden
Summerland Key FL
"Gnarly's Poop Deck" Hull #340
wooden
 
Posts: 65
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Re: REPLACEMENT CENTERBOARD AVAILABLE

Postby Bill » Sat Jan 16, 2016 9:58 pm

I have been looking for a boat for a while, am buying a 2007 with a broken board, appears foam core, two pieces still connected by the fiberglass skin on one side, no obvious evidence of having struck anything hard. On other boats I have seen variously: a plywood board that appeared to be de-laminating, a board with a longitudinal crack visible in the front (when retracted), and healthy boards.
It appears that the stock board wasn't always strong enough, and plywood isn't the way to go. Does anyone have an informed opinion as to whether it is possible for the board to be too strong, such that the trunk would break before the board? How about the replacement board mentioned here?
Bill
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 7:11 pm
Location: CT

Re: REPLACEMENT CENTERBOARD AVAILABLE

Postby wingman71 » Sun Jan 17, 2016 1:54 am

I have the first replacement board from CLC and it works well. It is made of layered wood that CLC cut into slices and reversed every other slice to prevent warping. They also make the replacement boards for Gemini.

I worked with Tony and CLC to ensure that the board would fit.

I do not have time tonight to go into the details of replacement but I do have a write up somewhere I can probably dig up. It was posted earlier, if you look at my past messages on this topic.

I suppose you could somehow put enough lateral force on the board that it would fling the case in which it is housed, but that would be a rare occurrence, I suspect.

BTW, I have proof that if the main hull is open to the sea and fills, the amas will keep you afloat!
wingman71
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:52 am

Re: REPLACEMENT CENTERBOARD AVAILABLE

Postby wooden » Sun Jan 17, 2016 6:10 am

I would love to hear about your open hull story when you have time. Sounds exciting, and possibly educational.
Steve & Mittie Wooden
Summerland Key FL
"Gnarly's Poop Deck" Hull #340
wooden
 
Posts: 65
Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:37 am

Re: REPLACEMENT CENTERBOARD AVAILABLE

Postby Bill » Sat Apr 16, 2016 2:39 am

Just built and installed a new centerboard, based on the dimensions from the pieces of the old one. Probably similar to the CLC board, western red cedar core, 4 12' 2x4s ($170, ouch) ripped and cut in half, alternate pieces flipped and glued, to reduce warping. I used glass fabric with a layer of roving toward the middle, for added strength. Tried glass mat on one side, a disaster to try to wet out and keep flat, fibers kept rubbing loose. Penetrating epoxy on wood before glassing, barrier coat on outside after fairing. Board possibly could be a hair thicker, better than being too thick and not fitting. Tricky to guess how thick the glass layers will work out to be. Finished board max thickness about 1 3/4", trunk seems to be 1 7/8" wide toward the top, in the front.
Installing the board today, I was able to use a temporary wood dowel with a screw in the end to grab and pull out, to avoid having to drill a hole in the port side of the trunk to drive a temporary pin out, as shown in the video.
Jacked up the boat on the trailer, not comfortable going higher than about 1 1/2' (tires from the ground, my cribbing material not the best), had to dig a 2' hole to get the board sufficiently vertical to drop out. Because of the the starboard cheeks, the board has to slide straight down, but because the top of the board is forward of the slot opening when the board isn't vertical, the board must be angled most of the way down, to come free. Didn't know that when I started. Disconnected the front axle and removed the transverse frame piece between the axles, to allow board to swing down.
Bottom line, unless you are retired guy who likes to do things the hard way, get the CLC replacement and use a travel lift. I will say that it is probably easier to sand and paint the bottom with the trailer jacked up.
Bill
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 7:11 pm
Location: CT

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